Tag: Windows 2008

A temporary profile is loaded after you log on to Windows 2008.

To resolve this problem, follow the steps given below:

1. Click Start, type regedit in the Start Search box, and then press ENTER.

2. If you are prompted for an administrator password or for confirmation, type your password, or click Continue.
Locate the following registry subkey:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList

3. Under the ProfileList subkey, delete the subkey that is named SID.bak.

Note SID is a placeholder for the security identifier (SID) of the user account that is experiencing the problem. The SID.bak subkey should contain a ProfileImagePath registry entry that points to the original profile folder of the user account that is experiencing the problem.

4. Exit Registry Editor.

5. Log off the system.

6. Log on to the system again.

Filed under: Windows(2003/2008/2012)Tagged with: , , , ,

How to Enable and disable NICs from command line?

Often when you are troubleshooting an issue with Windows Operating System, you would use the Command Prompt and there are scenarios were you would need to disable one of the NIC using command line, I often need this while troubleshooting with imaging issue. I’ve got the handy command.

C:\>wmic nic get name, index

you will find the output like
1 Broadcom NetLink (TM) Gigabit Ethernet
2 Broadcom NetLink (TM) Gigabit Ethernet #2
3 WAN Miniport (L2TP)
4 WAN Miniport (PPTP)
5 WAN Miniport (PPPOE)
6 WAN Miniport (IP)
7 Intel(R) WiFi Link 5100 AGN
8 WAN Miniport (Network Monitor)

Now, if you wish to disable “Broadcom NetLink (TM) Gigabit Ethernet #2”

Please execute the below command

C:\>wmic path win32_networkadapter where index=2 call disable

This should now disable the NIC “Broadcom NetLink (TM) Gigabit Ethernet #2”

Thanks
WintelAdmin

Filed under: Windows(2003/2008/2012)Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Convert HP Standard TCP/IP ports to MS Standard TCP/IP ports

The print spooler may crash or experience unexpected behavior such as high CPU utilization. Additionally, some printers may display “offline” status.

This behavior can occur due to HPTCPMON.DLL, HP’s Standard TCP/IP port.

Most network printers support the TCP/IP protocol. The standard TCP/IP port simplifies connecting to remote printers using the TCP/IP protocol. A computer that acts as a print server must run the TCP/IP protocol in order to print.

Follow the below steps to convert to MS Standard TCP/IP Ports:

1. Open the registry editor and export the following key to a .REG file.
2. HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Print\Monitors\HP Standard TCP/IP Port
3. Delete the following registry key.
4. HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Print\Monitors\HP Standard TCP/IP Port
5. Open the .REG file created in step 1 with Notepad.
6. From the Edit menu, choose Replace.
7. Replace all instances of “HP Standard TCP/IP Port” with “Standard TCP/IP Port” and save the file.
8. Double click the .REG file to import it.
9. Change the “Driver” value under the following key back to “tcpmon.dll”.
10. HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Print\Monitors\Standard TCP/IP Port
11. Restart the Print Spooler service.

-WintelAdmin.

Filed under: Windows(2003/2008/2012)Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , ,